Monday, November 12, 2012

Use Repetition

Right side of her front door, below, variegated liriope is already established.  Space is limited at the front of her 30 year old townhome.  


 In a tight space repetition makes space feel larger.  Variegated liriope was chosen for the left side of her front door, below.  If it had been asiatic jasmine already on the right side, then that would have been the left side choice....


She said, "I don't know if something is wrong with me but I do not like RED!"  Double flowering Encore azaleas were sourced, below.


She is sourcing a new light fixture now.  Will not show you the 'after' pic until this offensive unit, below, is gone.


When the guys had pick-ax to 30 year old green meatballs she was JUMPING.  When they were safely deposited on our dump truck she hugged me.
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I really like what I can do for professional women over 60!!!!!!
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Yes, I was jumping & hugging too.  It never gets old, REMOVING UGLY.
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Garden & Be Well,   XO Tara
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Helen Dillon says REPETITION is the most important thing in Garden Design.
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When space is tight at a property line I often use what the neighbor already has planted.  A win for my client, a win for the neighbor.  Both gardens look larger & FLOW better.  My ego isn't about annihilation and a clean slate.  My ego is all about getting it right.
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Can't wait till spring, we're doing her back patio.


5 comments:

Desert Dweller said...

This is a gold mine of a post...that is a good ego, the want to get it right. I share that ego 2000 miles to your west.

And repetition, removing ugly...bingo!

Margaret said...

Forgive me! I have the same offensive lantern. It's easy to change a burned out bulb.

Pink Overalls @DIY Home Staging said...

Yes, planting what your neighbor has at the boundary line would mean transcending ego, so I guess that's why no one does. Thanks for the idea. Now, let me see if I can practice it.

Ellen @Color Calling said...

Tara, this is brilliant. I am sharing your enthusiasm from one state over!

Lyn C said...

Hi Tara would someone enlighten this Aussie reader as to what 'old green meatballs' may be?