Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Working With The Earth

An allee of trees with triple axis, below, do you see? The Wild Wood remains, but with several paths entering. (Alert Poppets: This is perfect pollinator habitat with low density-high density & canopy-understory-groundcover, plus multiple seasons of bloom/berry/seed.)But first, below, an oval of turf. What's left, red clay, will become meadow (clover, fescue, bulbs, English daisy, ageratum, rudbeckia fulgida x fulgida, what the wind blows in & etc.)
Broad dry stone steps, below, taming the slope. Meadow, mown at 3 heights
will carpet these steps.
.
Garden & Be Well, XO Tara
.
Will keep you posted on this garden, it's phasing in over the next year. I adore each process of creating a beautiful landscape. Wish you could smell what it's like. Churning up the soil, laying sod, placing stone & etc. Love how the earth releases it's myriad aromas during this phase, exotic-musky-ancient-clean, accepts what we do then calms itself. Leaving only memories of its exciting scent.

7 comments:

Desert Dweller said...

I can see that terraced space already in my mind. And how it would work in the desert, prairie, and esp your area. Looks like one will drive or walk by it along the lower end, to see the rolls.

Thanks for the notes on the fragrances!

Last night I dreamed of reading a book w/ diagrams of focal points & axis on a page...oh no!

lakeviewer said...

Tara, I visit here often, enjoying every piece of advice, then fussing in my garden to recreate that principle I just saw illustrated. Great advice, wonderful illustrations.

lakeviewer said...

p.s. I just shared you on Facebook. Thanks again for all you do.

BWS said...

Love the scent of the process post, priceless...

Terry said...

That odor of digging deep in clay is unmistakable for southerners. Neither the best nor the worst. Were you in town when they dug the foundations for the Ravinia at Perimeter Center?

Stephanie Mealor Corder said...

I love that we can see one of your beautiful creations from it's conception and will be able to watch as it comes into fruition. Thanks you so much for sharing this!

home before dark said...

I grew up in Oklahoma. Red clay does have its own beauty...well, sometimes. So agree with you about the scent. It's primal and nurturing.